Passing the Canadian Citizenship Test

Canadian Parliament in OttawaIn order to become a citizen of Canada you must be able to pass a test about Canadian rights, duties and geography among other facts with either the English or French language. Of course, people under the age of 14 or older than 64 are not required to take the test. There have been some very serious changes made to the citizenship test in the past two years and it has become significantly more difficult to pass. However, this does not mean that it is impossible to pass, but rather it means that one just has to study more diligently.

Below we have some information that you may be quizzed on during the citizenship test.

  • Canadian citizens have certain responsibilities to the state which include serving on a jury, voting, being lawful, being financially responsible for yourself and your family, volunteering and assisting the community, and environmental conservation.
  • Canadians happen to be entitled to a variety of rights and it is in your best interest to be familiar with all of them. Canadians have the right to vote in democratic elections; enter and leave Canada at will, live anywhere in Canada or to live outside of Canada; the right to legal counsel and habeas corpus; the right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty; and a right to equal treatment under law. There are many other rights guaranteed by the Canadian government and you should take the time to understand them all before taking the citizenship test.
  • There are also a set of freedoms granted to Canadian citizens. These freedoms include the freedom of conscience, religion, thought, belief, expression, press, peaceful assembly and association.
  • The responsibility of taking care of yourself and your family means that you should get a job and work in such a way that benefits you and your family as well as Canada.
  • Serving on a jury should be a point of pride and Canadians are legally required to serve in juries when called upon. By serving on a jury you will be assisting the Canadian government in its execution of its judicial responsibilities.

More information on gaining Canadian citizenship can be found on our website.