What Does Canadian Multiculturalism Mean?

Two events in recent news have illustrated Canadian’s desires to be a multicultural state: the selection of an Anglophone mayor of Montreal and a statement made by Minister Kenney to Coptic Pope Tawadros II.

Many people seek Permanent Resident status in Canada every year because they know that their culture and language will be respected within the most multicultural country in the world.

There are many countries throughout the world which have state instituted religions or official languages designed to marginalize people (Canada maintains official languages to give them a certain level of status and to avoid their marginalization), but not in Canada.

Minister Jason Kenney, the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism, made a statement in Egypt on Monday that congratulated Pope Tawadros II for his most recent appointment to his most holy position. Minister Kenney is Catholic, himself. In Canada all religions are respected regardless of a particular person’s religious doctrine as long as that doctrine does not promote violence or hate. Due to recent persecution of Copts in parts of Africa it may be possible for them to get a refugee or asylee visa to Canada.

The appointment of an English-speaking interim mayor to the city of Montreal is indeed quite extraordinary. In Montreal, and all of Quebec, the French language is fiercely defended as part of the very identity of the Quebecois (or Quebecer) and is a symbol of their sovereignty within the country of Canada. However, this identity does not breed any sort of outright prejudice and it was decided that Michael Applebaum is an appropriate ruler for the French speaking city.

Canada offers government forms and documents in a variety of languages with Asian varieties becoming very popular in recent years. However, in order to become a Canadian citizen you must demonstrate competence in either English or French.